Posts Tagged ‘learning resources’

Most outstanding Australian classroom resources announced

Australian educators and publishers last night celebrated a year of making outstanding resources for student learning across the country at the Educational Publishing Awards Australia. Twenty vital learning tools produced by local publishers and used in primary, secondary and tertiary classrooms were awarded.

Two new awards were presented this year at The Arts Centre, Melbourne. The Scholarly Non-Fiction award for a work that serves the education market, had 34 nominations and five shortlisted, with Charles Massy’s agriculture-meets-ecology tome Call of the Reed Warbler (University of Queensland Press) taking out the inaugural prize. Using his personal experience from a chemical-using farmer to a radical ecologist the judges said, “Call of the Reed Warbler exemplifies the potential of research-based writing to speak beyond the academy, enriching public discussion and, without question, the lives of its readers.”

The second new award was made in honour of Professor Mike Horsley, who co-founded the EPAAs in 1994. The award is for dedication to the educational publishing sector and was awarded to Firefly Education’s Peter Stannard, who has been serving the sector for fifty years.

Firefly Education had a good night with three trophies, including one for most outstanding primary resource for Sound Waves Foundation. The judges said this resource was innovative in harnessing sound searches and bespoke images to help students use sound for literacy development.

Other outstanding winning resources were Poems to Share II produced by AATE and Red Room Poetry for secondary, and the Clinical Placement Manual for the Diploma of Nursing 1e by Catherine Joustra and Ali Moloney published by Cengage. The judges considered Poems to Share II a uniquely designed box set of cards and praised the use of creative writing works from students alongside teachers and established poets.

Judges commented that Clinical Placement Manual for the Diploma of Nursing 1e is well-designed for student self-assessment in that its Work Experience tool practically supports students’ work placements.

For the second year in a row Publisher of the Year was awarded to PLD Literacy (primary) and Oxford University Press (secondary).

Keynote speakers of the evening were Lian Davies – principal at Whittlesea Secondary College and previous Educator Rising Star recipient – plus the Copyright Agency’s Reading Australia Fellow for a Teacher of English and Literacy, Alex Wharton, who shared about his research into the textual representation of First Nation and non-First Nation colonial experience to will inform English teaching practice.

Other speakers on the night included Member for Higgins Dr Katie Allen MP, who has authored numerous scholarly texts in the area of pediatrics, and major sponsor of the event, the Copyright Agency’s Adam Suckling.

The event was coordinated by the Schools and Education Publishing Committee and supported by the Tertiary and Professional and Scholarly and Journal Publishing committees of the Australian Publishers Association.

Special thanks to our major sponsor: The Copyright Agency, and also to sponsors: OPUS Group, Newgen KnowledgeWorks, VitalSource, ReadCloud, IndigiPrint, CQUniversity, AAP Photos and Books + Publishing.

Read the full list of winners see this page on the website.

 

Interview with keynote speaker, educator and Principal, Lian Davies

Portrait of Lian Davies

Portrait of Lian DaviesLian Davies is an educator and leader with a passion for global educational systems and strategies focussing on student centred learning. Lian has worked in both Scottish and English schools in the UK, developing her leadership skills while navigating a new country and education system she became an Assistant Principal and Acting Principal in NZ in 2011. Lian moved to become Assistant Principal at Templestowe College in 2016. Continuing to develop an innovative model of education, Lian is now Principal at Whittlesea Secondary College. Lian was the winner of The Educator Rising Star Awards 2018.

Lian is one of two keynote speakers for the Educational Publishing Awards Australia in 2019. She shares her thoughts on educational products below. 

 

What first inspired you to embark on a career in education? Is that what keeps you there today? 

I first considered education when I was studying at university. I became part of a peer mentoring program for students who were in earlier years of our degree course. I realised how much I enjoyed helping others learn as well as how much more I understood the work through teaching it. I signed up for a post graduate teaching course after completing my honours degree and have never looked back. The pleasure of helping young people learn is a strong driver and I love to continue learning myself.

 

You’ve worked in a few countries. What differences have you observed about educational publishing products and purchasing them across these countries (if any)?

I have worked in Scotland, England, New Zealand and Australia. Each has its own educational systems but a common theme is the need for good quality resources to support educators in delivering engaging and challenging learning experiences for students. As the years have gone on what these resources might look like has gradually changed from the standard text book to more interactive materials. Australia and New Zealand have some strong publishers and materials that are used on both sides of the ditch and educators know they can rely on them for quality and supporting students to engage with the curriculum knowledge.

 

You are passionate about student-centred learning. For those who may not know what this is could you please explain it briefly?

Student centred learning is focussed on designing learning experiences that recognise and respond to the individual needs of each student. It is moving away from the previous methods of the teacher being the front and centre and all students following the lead.

Student centred educators and schools are working to understand and support student learning, rather than focusing on how best to teach or how to cover the curriculum.

We aim to actively create opportunities for families and communities to participate as equal partners in their children’s education and empower students to lead their own learning as much as possible.

 

How and where do you see this reflected in Australian learning resources (if at all)? What further knowledge needs to be shared to make learning resources for this model/approach? Or is this being done really well already?

Learning resources are starting to reflect this by providing a variety of media for our learners to engage with. An example would be a text book having a digital version or an audio version. I know a large number of my students who use text to speech software to support them in listening to books whilst studying. I have also seen interactive activities with some digital resources that engage our learners in a way they feel is interesting and stimulating. This shift to multiple media creates opportunities for learners to engage and experience learning differently.

 

Another thing you are dedicated to is about empowering students to take control of their own learning. How do learning resources help students feel empowered? Are resources helping towards this end?

As mentioned above by providing a variety of mixed media resources that students can engage with to suit their needs is a key to empowering our young people. In an age where we are understanding more around neurodiversity we want to be able to provide options for our students to engage with a range of quality materials. Flipped learning is a popular tool and allows young people to research, watch or engage with learning topics before they come into the classroom and explore these ideas further.

 

When it comes to choosing educational resources for your school, what features do you look out for? Why? 

This can be a complex one as it depends on the subjects, the teams who are teaching and using the resources as well as the students themselves. The ability to cover key curriculum areas, whilst not limiting to only that information is often looked at. We want to support our learners to find key information but engage their thinking and learning to relevance in the real world. Engaging them through high quality diagrams, or online pictures often allows them to see things we may not have within the classroom environment. Having links to media they can look at engages our young digital natives into an environment they are familiar with and can learn from quickly.

 

Is there a particular Australian resource that you really value? What aspects of it really work for you, your staff and your students?

As a science educator I always appreciated the resources that considered not only the students with books and ebooks or apps, but also provided support notes for technicians or teachers to help with practical experiments and activities. Some of the resources had clearly spent a great deal of time considering all aspects of the learning outcomes and how to ensure everyone referring to the resources were best equipped to deliver this effectively.

 

Register to hear Lian Davies speak at the Educational Publishing Awards being held in Melbourne on 4 September 2019. 

Principal ,

Call for entries 2019 (now extended)

What resources are you really proud of that you produced recently and you know are making a difference in the classroom?

They could be a print resource such as a textbook or workbook, with or without a supporting teacher book, a digital only resource such as a website, CD/DVD or app), an enhanced eBook, or a blended learning resource. Whatever format they are in… enter them in the EPAAs for 2019!

Entries are open today for Australian educational publishers to submit their best learning resources made and published between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019 to the country’s eminent educational publishing awards. Enter now to be in the running!

The Educational Publishing Awards Australia will celebrate – for the 26th year in a row – excellence in producing vital learning tools used by educators and their students across primary, secondary and tertiary sectors.

This year’s awards feature two new categories: one for a scholarly non-fiction publications and the other will be announced shortly!

The venue for the awards night is already booked – The Pavilion, Arts Centre Melbourne – and will take place a little earlier this year, on Wednesday 4 September 2019. Tickets will go on sale soon but get the date into your diary.

The call for entries is now open:

Nominations must be submitted by Friday, 31 May 2019. (NB. This has been extended from 24 May).

Please read the conditions of entry and judging criteria before submitting your nomination here.

Whether you are a traditional publishing company, a niche publisher or a digital start-up, do enter, because we would love to consider and recognise your learning resource.

The awards will be presented in Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and TAFE & Vocational Education categories as well as the Primary and Secondary Publisher of the Year.

Take a look at the list of 2019 categories here.

How do I enter?

Entries are made via this digital platform.

Head to this link to read the criteria for each category and follow the prompts to submit your learning resource.

Judging 2019

Judging of the awards is a rigorous process for all involved. Back for a fourth year in a row is Chief Judge, Professor Angela Carbone, Associate Dean (Learning Innovation), Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology at Swinburne University of Technology. An overall winner for each sector (Primary, Secondary and Tertiary and TAFE & Vocational) will be selected by the Chief Judge from the category winners.

Interested to see who won in 2018? Or need a reminder?

Take a look here at the full list of previous winners.

2019 could be your year. Start submitting and we look forward to hosting you in Melbourne on 4 September.

 

Keep up to date and join the conversation:

W: edpubawards.com

T: @EPAs_Aus

F: facebook.com/edpubawards

 

2018 WINNERS ANNOUNCED FOR AUSTRALIAN EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING AWARDS

The connection between Australian educators and publishers, who create learning resources for the classroom, was last week celebrated at the Educational Publishing Awards of Australia in Melbourne.

Twenty-three winners were announced across three broad categories of primary, secondary and tertiary education.

The big winners of the evening were PLD – a learning and literacy organisation and Oxford University Press (OUP) who were awarded Primary and Secondary Publisher of the Year respectively, as voted by Australian teachers.

Director of PLD Diana Rigg was thrilled that her organisation won the award being the first time they were nominated. “We create tools for primary educators to enhance literacy development in young children and we’re so grateful to be recognised by teachers across the country,” Ms Rigg said.

Daniel Aspinall from OUP was really proud of his workplace being named Secondary Publisher of the Year for the second year in a row. “What we do is for teachers and students and to better education in Australia overall. It’s a team effort, we work with many people to bring resources to the classroom and we’re really pleased with the award,” he said.

Keynote speaker for the event, TV presenter and primary school teacher, Shelley Ware, shared with more than 200 individuals in attendance her personal story of needing quality, engaging texts as a young person with literacy difficulties, and as a teacher, and as a parent of a child with similar reading difficulties that she faced.

In her speech, Ms Ware reinforced teachers’ love of good educational resources and the joy teachers feel when a new package arrives from publishers sharing new materials.

Ms Ware also shared her journey in becoming an educational resource author — starting with being asked to prepare ten lessons for Sunshine Classics’ Teachers Notes, which was shortly updated to 130 lessons.

Along with Shelley Ware, awards were presented by Adam Suckling from the Copyright Agency who were the major sponsors of the event, as well as President of the Australian Publishers Association and Schools Director of Oxford University Press, Lee Walker.

Award winners were selected by a panel of judges led by Associate Professor Angela Carbone from Swinburne University.

Images from the event can be sourced here.

View the full list of winners.