Posts Tagged ‘education Australia’

Building an outstanding primary learning resource

Macmillan Education was the winner of the most outstanding resource for Primary school at the Educational Publishing Awards this year. They share the extent to which educators and experts were involved in developing winning resource STEM Investigations for Upper Primary.

Written by highly qualified teaching professionals, aligned with the national curriculum, tested by teachers, edited by science experts, and praised by teacher-users, the learning resource was declared “a stand out” by the judges of the Educational Publishing Awards.

Commissioning Editor for the Primary School Division at Macmillan Education Georgina Garner says, “Macmillan partners with educators and experts that specialise in the subjects they publish. We engaged experienced STEM educators to author and consult on this product.

“Specific research and concept development for the learning resource began in 2016 and the product was published March 2018.

“The resource was developed to cover Australian Curriculum (and certain state curriculum) objectives in Maths, Science and Technology,” Ms Garner shares. “Each investigation idea, such as designing an earth-quake resistant building or designing a lighting and sound system for a school disco, is clearly linked to objectives in these subject areas, as teachers need to know what goal they are working towards to assess success and to plan their teaching time effectively. The author team who created the inquiry ideas are all current or former educators.

The Educational Publishing Award judges chose the STEM learning resource as its innovative set of investigation cards focused on real-world problems, in which students are guided to follow a five-step Stanford University Design Thinking model to apply STEM knowledge and skills.

 

When asked why she thinks they were chosen as a stand out by the judges, Ms Garner says it’s down to addressing the two audiences in the one product. “STEM Investigations for Upper Primary has a highly comprehensive Teacher Resource Book. It provides everything a primary school teacher needs in one place in a logical order with an accessible design – from teacher PD, planning, quality questions and activities, apps, video links etcetera.”

For students she says, “It addresses real world problems and gives them an opportunity to explore solutions to those problems which could ultimately make an impact in their local communities. There are 20 challenges but there are an endless number of potential solutions.”

The lead author on the project was Charlotte Forward who holds a PhD (exploring student understanding of Science vocabulary), has a Master of Teaching, and is in the classroom full-time. Prior to this project she was involved in a pilot STEM program, High Possibility Classrooms, with Dr. Jane Hunter from the University of Technology Sydney and Independent Schools Victoria.

The editing process for the resource followed standard processes and quality control markers with an in-house editorial lead, supported by the managing and commissioning editor.

“A freelance editor with a strong science background was used consistently across the series.” Ms Garner explains. “And several touchpoints with authors and the publishing team were added into the review process.” Macmillan Education drew on a number of education consultants for feedback at key points in the process.

While STEM education is not yet reflected in its own curricula, the subject is highly valued by several governments around the world due to links with future economic prospects and employment opportunities. PricewaterhouseCoopers estimates that “changing 1 per cent of Australia’s workforce into STEM-related roles would add $57.4 billion to GDP.”**

Ms Garner explains, “The Australian Government’s National Innovation and Science Agenda was announced in December 2015 outlining a number of initiatives designed to increase the participation of all school students and the wider community in STEM and improve their digital literacy. This was backed with four-year funding from 2016.”

Macmillan Education has received very positive feedback from teachers who have used STEM Investigations for Upper Primary so far. Bruce Armstrong, Science teacher at Karoo Public School said in a review published in Science Teachers’ Association of Victoria Inc. Journal:

“STEM Investigations for Upper Primary will equip any classroom teacher with an exciting variety of possible projects and the necessary tools to make the investigations highly engaging and productive, even if they have little experience in facilitating STEM investigations.”

A curriculum leader in Victoria says, “I have purchased both upper and middle packs through Macmillan as I was drawn to the incorporation of the d-school design thinking model. This is a real point of different from other resources I have seen, which generally focus on toys, rather than the thinking. The kit that you (Macmillan Education) have put out is the best one I have seen so far.”

This successful resource has been built in collaboration with the specific outcome of giving teachers everything they need to inspire and encourage STEM skills and thinking in their classrooms. Akin to the goal of STEM in problem solving, Ms Garner says, “All successful educational publishing meets a need. If a resource helps the teacher better meet a student need, then the resource will have longevity.”

 

**(PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC), A Smart Move: future-proofing Australia’s workforce by growing skills in STEM (2015)).

Many thanks to Georgina Garner and Alexandra Harper from Macmillan Education. 

2018 WINNERS ANNOUNCED FOR AUSTRALIAN EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING AWARDS

The connection between Australian educators and publishers, who create learning resources for the classroom, was last week celebrated at the Educational Publishing Awards of Australia in Melbourne.

Twenty-three winners were announced across three broad categories of primary, secondary and tertiary education.

The big winners of the evening were PLD – a learning and literacy organisation and Oxford University Press (OUP) who were awarded Primary and Secondary Publisher of the Year respectively, as voted by Australian teachers.

Director of PLD Diana Rigg was thrilled that her organisation won the award being the first time they were nominated. “We create tools for primary educators to enhance literacy development in young children and we’re so grateful to be recognised by teachers across the country,” Ms Rigg said.

Daniel Aspinall from OUP was really proud of his workplace being named Secondary Publisher of the Year for the second year in a row. “What we do is for teachers and students and to better education in Australia overall. It’s a team effort, we work with many people to bring resources to the classroom and we’re really pleased with the award,” he said.

Keynote speaker for the event, TV presenter and primary school teacher, Shelley Ware, shared with more than 200 individuals in attendance her personal story of needing quality, engaging texts as a young person with literacy difficulties, and as a teacher, and as a parent of a child with similar reading difficulties that she faced.

In her speech, Ms Ware reinforced teachers’ love of good educational resources and the joy teachers feel when a new package arrives from publishers sharing new materials.

Ms Ware also shared her journey in becoming an educational resource author — starting with being asked to prepare ten lessons for Sunshine Classics’ Teachers Notes, which was shortly updated to 130 lessons.

Along with Shelley Ware, awards were presented by Adam Suckling from the Copyright Agency who were the major sponsors of the event, as well as President of the Australian Publishers Association and Schools Director of Oxford University Press, Lee Walker.

Award winners were selected by a panel of judges led by Associate Professor Angela Carbone from Swinburne University.

Images from the event can be sourced here.

View the full list of winners. 

Marngrook presenter, Shelley Ware, keynote at the awards

 

Presenter for NITV-SBS footy show, Marngrook, Shelley Ware is today announced as the keynote speaker at the Educational Publishing Awards of Australia.

A proud Yankunyjatjara and Wirangu woman from Adelaide, South Australia, Ms Ware is a trained educator with 20 years experience in the classroom, and author of  Teaching Notes for the Sunshine Classics digital and print literacy program.

Convener of the Schools and Education Publishing Committee for the Australian Publishers Association, Brendan Bolton, from Cengage Education, says he is thrilled that Shelley Ware is the keynote.

“Ms Ware will share her experience as a teacher, author and leader in literacy advocacy,” Bolton said.

Ms Ware says she loves talking about football and its culture, but raising awareness for high-standard education is another of her passions.

“I’m honoured to speak to educational publishers and teachers at this event. I know first-hand the critical role quality learning resources are for the literacy of students across the nation,” Ware said.

“And I am also aware of the immense efforts involved in developing an educational resource that is relevant, effective and enjoyable for both teacher and student.”

Ms Ware coordinated a literacy intervention program for four years and is an ambassador for Indigenous Literacy Day.

More than 200 educational publishers and teachers will hear Ms Ware speak at The Arts Centre, Melbourne, on 20 September 2018.

Awards will be presented for learning resources from the Primary, Secondary and Tertiary sectors.

Judging of the awards has been coordinated by a committee led by Swinburne University’s Associate Dean of Learning Innovation, Professor Angela Carbone.

The Educational Publishing Awards of Australia will celebrate their 25th year with this event, which is coordinated by the Australian Publishers Association.

APA Media Contact: Alex Christopher, 02 9281 9788   

Learn more about teacher and keynote, Shelley Ware.