Educational publishing’s contribution to the education sector and economy

Educational publishing’s information booklet

Download the booklet here.

Forty-one percent of sales in Australian publishing comes from the educational resources sector and today, a small group of dedicated educational publishers are celebrating the release of a publication that showcases the successes and hard work of these quiet achievers of the book world. 

Brendan Bolton, International Business Manager of Cengage and convenor of the Schools Educational Publishers Committee (SEPC) of the Australian Publishers Association says, “The Committee created this booklet to celebrate Australian educational publishing – both its history of partnering with teachers to provide the best for students, and its future at the cutting edge of the publishing industry.”

The SEPC is excited to announce the publication of its new booklet which was made possible by the support of the Copyright Agency. 

The publication includes clear statistics detailing the industry’s economic input and social contributions, as well as teacher testimonials regarding quality educational resources. Case studies demonstrate the international recognition Australian educational publishers have – for example, the island of Tuvalu using one Australian phonetics resource for more than 60% of the small country’s teaching population. Another case study highlights the work being done to include Indigenous languages in educational resource development. 

The Chief Executive of the Australian Publishers Association Michael Gordon-Smith says, “This little booklet offers a glimpse of the way Australian educational publishers make a difference for Australian teachers and students. Quality learning resources are important for quality education.”

The publication aims to reach teachers to share how the industry works to partner with them, supporting them to bring the Australian curriculum with engaging and relevant material. It also advocates for the value of the sector to decision and policy makers. 

The Australian Publishers Association will be distributing physical copies to education departments, curriculum architects and educational institutions across Australia. 

If you would like to learn more about the value of educational publisher’s contributions to the Australian educational system, economy and social fabric please be in touch. 

Copies can be made available for free to individuals for their own reference or to to pass on. Be in touch with the Australian Publishers Association for more information

Download a digital copy here.

For physical copies of the booklet, please email office (@) publishers.asn.au

If you are interested in learning more about the Schools Education Publishers Committee and the Australian Publishers Association, visit our website, join our mailing list, or consider becoming a member, at publishers.asn.au/.

Peter van Noorden : 2020 Mike Horsley Award recipient

We spoke with Peter van Noorden, formerly of Oxford University Press, who was recently recognised for his service to the sector at the Educational Publishing Awards of Australia as 2020’s Mike Horsley Award recipient. Peter shared with us how he determines success in a learning resource, how he sees COVID-19 impacting the sector long-term, and what projects are keeping him going at the moment. 

Congratulations on being selected as the second Mike Horsley Award recipient. Did you ever work with Professor Mike Horsley? What are your memories of him?

I worked with Mike on the APA Education Committee for many years. He was larger than life and bowled you over with his relentless positivity. He was so passionate about how educational resources could best deliver meaningful pedagogical principles and was working with the efficacy of our resources long before the term was formulated. To be given an award named in his honour is a real privilege.

You started out as a teacher (as many educational publishers and authors do.) Why did you make the shift to publishing? 

All I ever wanted to be was an educator; and I have been lucky enough to be able to carve out a career in education – first as a teacher and then as a developer of learning materials. 

Right from day one I have had a passion for student engagement. Teaching and learning are much easier and fulfilling if the students are engaged in what they are doing. The biggest compliment I ever received from a student was from a boy who said “Mr Van – that was almost interesting.” Developing engaging educational materials became my passion, and I wrote my first textbook, Living Geography, for Heinemann (now part of Pearson) in just my third year of teaching. In my ten years as a teacher I wrote six Geography and History textbooks, so a progression into educational publishing was natural for me.

How do you measure success in a resource?

For me, a successful educational resource is one where the student is looking at page 73 when they have been asked to go to page 24 – because they are engaged to do so. Really great educational resources like Science Quest (Jacaranda), Maths Plus (OUP) and PM Benchmark (Cengage) also give students confidence through a clear set of steps to follow that help them progress. These resources are still popular after more than 20 years in the market.

What was the sector like when you started making educational products? What were you focusing on when developing your first resources? How did that change over the years?

When I wrote my first textbook in the mid-eighties, colour was just being introduced as a factor to engage students. My complete focus was on student engagement, so my first Geography text had new chapters such as Stereotypes and Endangered Species – not the topics that were traditionally studied in Geography. Engagement has always been the key principle for me in developing new resources, as learning doesn’t begin until a student is engaged to learn. Over the years I’ve learned more about learning pedagogy and better ways to help students progress and gain confidence in what they are doing. I have been very lucky to work with some of the very best researchers, publishers and teachers in this regard. I have been privileged to attend educational conferences all over the world and work with many international publishers. I think Australia has the most sophisticated and engaging educational materials anywhere in the world. 

Looking at the impact of COVID-19 on the educational sector, do you see educational publishers having changed forever? If so, in what ways?

COVID-19 has really thrust Educational publishing into the limelight. The value of really great resources is that they assist independent learning. Students have had less access to teachers over the last six months, so learning resources have needed to step up to the plate and provide clear learning paths for students. We know that in each year of school, the most advanced 10 per cent are about five to six years ahead of the least advanced 10 per cent, so educational resources need to find a way to help all students progress. I think ability progression is now the new Everest for governments, schools and educational publishers to conquer for independent learning to make some giant strides forward. The New South Wales Government are making some big moves in this direction.

What have you been working on since finishing up at OUP?

I found out pretty early that my true passion is in developing engaging and meaningful educational resources. Since leaving OUP in 2018 I have been studying educational magazines like How it Works, All About History and National Geographic. Magazines have to instantly call out to the reader to pick them up. I used many of the principles of engagement in magazines to write the new Good Humanities series with Matilda Education with two fabulous classroom practitioners. During COVID-19 lockdown over the last 6 months, I decided to sit down and write a new Science text based on ability progression. I’ve just finished the year 7 text and I’m starting on the year 8 text now. When I’ve perfected it, I’ll see if there is an educational publisher interested in developing it for the market.

The Senior Management Team at OUP, including APA President Lee Walker on the right. I followed the advice of my mentor, Peter Donoughue, in working with this talented group of managers – “Hire the best people and get the hell out of their way!”

What qualities do you see in people who work in educational publishing? Is it a career path you encourage others to walk down?

There are so many pathways for many different talents in educational publishing and so many great people to learn from. There are creative pathways such as writing and design to deliver the most engaging texts. Marketing, editing and software development need technical competence and flair to ensure a connection with the audience. Publishing and sales offer opportunities to connect in person with teachers and lecturers and work with them to develop solutions. Management pathways at many levels give the opportunity to foster the careers of others and develop teamwork and clarity of vision. I have been blessed to work with and learn from so many talented people in my career in educational publishing. The best advice I ever received was from my wonderful boss at Wiley – Peter Donoughue – who said, “Hire the best people and get the hell out of their way!”  

We’ve been working on a booklet (soon to be released) that showcases the value of educational publishing in Australia. Given your experience, can you pinpoint the value of Australia’s educational publishing industry?

Educational publishing brings together experts to work with educators to develop engaging material for all students, written specifically for the curriculum and pitched directly at the audience. 

Looking back on your career, do you have a highlight? 

There were highlights every day I went to work. In the beginning it was all about developing engaging resources that students and teachers would love to use. In my latter years as a manager it was all about encouraging excellence and giving others room to experiment and progress. Now I’m back to resource development and learning all I can about ability progression. I am up early every morning working on new ideas and as passionate as ever to make a difference in student engagement and progress.

Meeting with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in his office following the launch of the Australian National Dictionary at Parliament House in Canberra in 2016.

2020 Educational Publishing Awards Australia announced

A still from the EPAA 2020 digital ceremony

In a digital celebration that premiered online yesterday afternoon, publishers and educators celebrated excellence in educational publishing. On Zoom screens, Microsoft Teams calls, laptops and mobile phones in living rooms around the country, attendees celebrated 20 outstanding resources, as well as all those involved behind the scenes and in classrooms.

As many people shifted to making and using these vital educational resources from home during the coronavirus restrictions, this year’s Educational Publishing Awards also featured a range of speeches made from home, including keynotes from high-achieving educators Yasodai Selvakumaran and Jane Doyle, who respectively spoke about the importance of teaching diverse histories and the power of effective literacy teaching.

Our Land, Our Stories by Sally Lawrence, Lisa Fuller, Josie, Orlando and Shae et al., published by Nelson – A Cengage Company, partnered with AIATSIS, was awarded Outstanding Primary Resource, applauded by judges for its ‘authenticity in the way that it celebrates contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.’

PLD was awarded the 2020 Publisher of the Year for Primary for the third year running.

The 2020 Publisher of the Year for Secondary was Jacaranda, who also received the Outstanding Secondary Resource award for Jacaranda VCE Chemistry 1 Units 1 & 2 and Units 3 & 4 + studyON by Neale Taylor, Angela Stubbs and Robert Stokes et al., which judges commended for its ‘clear and accessible content and its direct alignment of content with the key knowledge and skill requirements of the study design.’

Financial Accounting, 9th edition by Craig Deegan, published by McGraw Hill, was awarded Outstanding Tertiary & VET Resource. Judges said this was ‘due to its comprehensive and memorable suite of resources and its student-focused approach.’

The Mike Horsley Award was presented to Peter van Noorden, celebrating a prolific career that has spanned more than 40 years. He was most recently the Managing Director of Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand – a position he held for about 12 years.

The Scholarly Non-Fiction Book of the Year award went to Australianama by Samia Khatun, published by University of Queensland Press, which judges called ‘an intriguing story that has required, in its telling, both careful, sustained research and familiarity with diverse and complex cultural traditions and areas of philosophy.’

The awards ceremony can be viewed at any time on YouTube. The event was coordinated by the Schools and Educational Publishing Committee and supported by the Tertiary and Professional, and Scholarly and Journal publishing committees of the Australian Publishers Association.

Special thanks to our major sponsor the Copyright Agency, and also to sponsors Newgen KnowledgeWorks and Learnosity.

Browse the 2020 EPAA catalogue here to see all the winning and shortlisted resources, or view the full list of winners and highly commended resources here. Award winners can access digital assets showcasing their win here.

Introducing our second keynote : Jane Doyle

A profile picture of teacher and leader Jane Doyle, getting her hands dirty at a student desk.

When Jane Doyle started teaching online to her kindergarten students in the early days of the pandemic, never did she think it would result in seeing intimate shots of the insides of their noses and throats as they became curious with webcam technology. “I never thought I might need to be an ear, nose and throat specialist!” Educator leadership was never an ambition of Jane’s either, but it came via chance and opportunity at every school she’s worked in across her 33 years in the Catholic primary education sector. Her current leadership role is as Coordinator of Training and Leadership for K-2 at Dominic College, in Glenorchy, Tasmania, where she oversees curriculum implementation and initiatives, resourcing and professional learning for teachers and students.

Jane is one of two award winning teachers speaking at the Educational Publisher Awards this year. She will share learnings as a teacher leader for Kinder to Year 2 educators and her thoughts on where educational publishers could position their offerings for “the new normal.” Below is a quick Q and A with Jane to get you acquainted prior to the EPAA event on 3 September.

Jane, how did things change for you when schools began closing down and transitioning to teaching online?

The biggest change for me was the realisation we needed to send all of our student’s stationery, books, and devices home so that we could continue to learn in the new term. I oversaw this for all of the K-2 classes. The immediate impact of the closing down of the school was a shock for us all because we actually didn’t think it would happen. Packing up our own resources and our classrooms for extra cleaning was surreal and hectic. Our parents were just as affected as we were.

The teaching staff worked onsite for the last four days of term, organising online lessons, timetables, resource packs to be photocopied and mailed home in case we didn’t have enough devices available. Then our thoughts turned to how we would need to recreate our classrooms while working from our homes.

During this time I was supervising the children of Essential workers and helped set up our Teacher Assistants to continue individual speech lessons, small group literacy and numeracy support lessons and ensure access to all of the online lessons.

This also was a time for improving teacher IT skills to ensure they were comfortable and competent in the online forum. Setting up my own learning space at home was not a focus at this point but I quickly realised I would need to do this to ensure I was ready for both of my roles at the beginning of Term 2!

You’ve said your greatest resource is your teachers, can you explain what that means to you?

This is a personal view, but it also correlates with the view of our College leadership. If our students have dynamic, skilled and happy teachers, learning will automatically occur. One of our founders, Don Bosco’s, greatest sayings is one we keep in the forefront of our minds: “It is not enough to love the young; they must know that they are loved.” This influences the way we engage with our students and flows into our approach to teaching and pastoral care at Dominic College.

How did you see your teachers respond to having to teach online all of a sudden? What did they most need from you?

The most important thing I could give my teachers in the lead up to remote learning was the confidence and reassurance that they could do it. We had a two week “holiday break” before the Term started, and I was available to them whenever they needed as I felt that a problem shared, is a problem halved. Most of my team continued to work throughout the holidays to ensure they were ready for the new term.

Towards the end of the first week of term, one of my most experienced team members suggested that we needed to meet for a social occasion. This made me aware that some teachers lived on their own and they were actually on their own while teaching and in downtime. This made me consider their health – mental and physical – and how we could connect to highlight they were not alone and that I was available for them if they needed me.

This became a valuable time because we shared as much as possible – especially resources found through our social platforms and networks.

I also supported them in becoming leaders within our team as well. Some of my team have more experience with online planning and with shortcuts that we could take, so our meetings became a collegiate approach to planning and problem solving when needed.

What aspects and features of teacher and student resources did you find really useful when transitioning to a digital classroom?

Some of the most useful resources needed to be accessible online. We now have an online reading program for Prep (Foundation) to Year Two. We also sourced an overseas Maths program because we were concerned that some of our students were missing out on vital practise time, which occurs naturally in the classroom.

Most of the classroom teachers took home hands-on resources from their classrooms to use in online lessons. We sent home small packs of resources with the children that included handwriting, alphabet and high frequency word charts; 10 frames, counters and dice and number cards; basic cards and resources that we could use for a variety of different games and activities in the home environment.

We already have some online resources for reading in Maths in Year 2 and have had these for several years. We introduced a couple of programs for Prep (Foundation) and Kinder to see if these would work in an online environment.

The main thing that teachers wanted with the activities was the ability for children to work at an instructional level and then at an enjoyment or practise level. The ability to use our online resources for guided reading was important to us but we had varying degrees of success. The main thing that we found useful was the ability to differentiate for our students using the same resource.

What did you find in transitioning to an online teaching that you were missing from resources available to you?

Apart from everyone having the same internet strength and connection! The main thing we found missing was the ability to give feedback straightaway and to examine everything that the students were doing as we normally do in the classroom; we needed to wait until they finished the activity before we could actually give feedback. There was also a large element of parent help in some of the activities and this meant that some work samples were not true indicators of student knowledge and understanding.

Video responses certainly helped but again some leading questions were often used to get the “right” answers. Parental understanding was sometimes different. To cater for this many teachers made videos of the same lesson with the children so the parents and students could watch it again. Some teachers also added extra instructions for the parents and other options for activities. The responses we viewed did not always show true evidence of understanding and needed to be repeated when we returned to face-to-face teaching at school. Many of our online and physical resources did not support the introduction of new learning.

How do you see the classroom changing in the long term, based on what you have learned in the Covid period?

There have been a large number of my teachers saying that they are now able to fully integrate technology in our classrooms because we have individual one-to-one devices for every student from Kinder to Year 10 (that’s nearly 1000 devices). Previously in the Early Years, we had 15 devices for each class, but these could be combined so everybody could have a one-to-one opportunity.

This now also provides an added dimension to our classroom planning and learning opportunities, where technology is can be a part of every lesson. We can continue to have small groups and provide the direct instruction needed. Early Years programs are enhanced because our students’ digital skills have improved. They are now able to create responses to activities instead of just using devices for play or practise.

A really positive result is the increased interaction we now have with our parents. For the first time our parents were tasked with actively “teaching” their children and keeping them engaged and up to date with classroom work.

What suggestions do you have for Australian educational publishers to prepare for the new opportunities in teaching?

The biggest change I foresee for Australian educational publishers is the storage, access 24/7 on each device and the variety available in this format.

It is a much cheaper option for us than buying large numbers of published book sets to use for guided reading, for individual writing, for home reading and for use in all curriculum areas. I think this is an area where publishers can consider focusing on.

Having a range of fiction and nonfiction stories available across all curriculum areas would be advantageous, particularly for the early years. I feel this is something that will be embraced by many teachers in all year levels.

I also think the addition of e-books and picture books based on the varying nationalities and cultures we now have in all Australian schools, would be well supported and a wonderful addition to our classroom libraries. We have many nationalities in our school and one of the greatest things that we can do is offer our children and their family’s opportunities to read in their first language and share these with children in our class. 

Our LOTE language is Japanese and we recently purchased a large number of picture books from Japan during our annual visit to our sister school. These help our children learn to read and speak more fluently in Japanese purely for enjoyment and to extend our program from oral language experience to encompass all aspects of language in familiar picture books.

I think having technology as a resource in our classrooms means that there are many different ways that we can use the same book / resource because we can read it alone with a friend or as a whole group; we can listen to it and interact with the story as it is being read to us. I think the most important thing is having an interactive aspect to any of the books that are published in the future because encouraging our children to respond using technology is the best way that we can move forward especially now that we have such amazing technological capacity available to us.

A profile picture of teacher and leader Jane Doyle, getting her hands dirty at a student desk.

 

To hear more insights from Jane Doyle, be sure to sign up for the online EPAA ceremony. Learn about the winners when they’re announced as a bonus!

Jane Doyle was recognised as the Australian Teacher of the Year by The Educator in 2018.

EPAA Cocktails

Bring a touch of panache to your night-in watching the EPAA awards ceremony AND practise your cocktail making skills at the same time! All in your PJs and house loafers. Why not?

We’ve got two cocktails that you can prepare for the screening — on Thursday 3 September 2020.

We start the evening with awards for the Primary educational publishing sector. For that, we’ll need a Teacher’s Pet.

The Teacher’s Pet:

Put ice in a glass
Start with 45mls of blended whiskey
Next, 15 mls of dry vermouth
Add a little teaspoon of sweet vermouth
And a dash of bitters

Garnish with orange and a maraschino cherry.

Sip, argggghhh. Warming and delicious.

 

We don’t have a name for this one yet, but maybe the EPAA-tini?
As we announce the Secondary and Tertiary educational publisher winners, call in springtime and dose up on vitamin C with these fruity flavours.

You will need limes, mint, passionfruit, sugar and something bubbly.

The EPAA-tini:

Choose a big glass
Put in 5 lime wedges and,
8 mint leaves.
Then add 16mls of sugar syrup
or just drop in a teaspoon of raw sugar

Muddle the limes, mint, sugar and then add in passionfruit pulp

Add ice all the way to the top of the glass – and fill with something fizzy (like soda water, lemonade or lemon squash)

We want to see how your team is celebrating. Take a snap of your cocktail creations and share it on socials — use the hashtag #EPAA2020 & #TeachersPet or #EPAAtini — and you could win a prize!
Cheers and…