The first Mike Horsley Award recipient – Peter Stannard

In September 2019, the educational publishing community awarded the first Mike Horsley Award in memory of the man who established the EPAAs and inspired so many. The inaugural recipient is Queensland-based author, publisher and teacher, Peter Stannard of Firefly Education who we hear from below. 

Read Peter’s reflections on the progression of his career and some highlights, and also the thoughts of those in his team, showing the family man and leader behind all the great literacy and education work he has been involved with for forty-odd years. 

Peter Stannard with his trophy at the Educational Publishing Awards Australia 2019 – at The Arts Centre, Melbourne.

About Professor Mike Horsley

I first met Mike briefly in 2006 and then again at an Educational Publishing Awards ceremony in 2007 where we had a long conversation about why I should be actively involved in the APA. He was very keen to get home-grown Australian publishing companies involved in the APA. I then suggested that I come up to Noosa to chat with him since it’s only a 45 minute drive from the Firefly office. We spent a very fruitful couple of hours talking about teaching, schools and educational publishing beside the Noosa River at Noosaville where he lived. We had a number of these get-togethers on the river and during these times I got to understand his drive and passion to help kids learn.

Teaching and writing

After graduating in 1967, I became a science teacher at Noosa District State High School. Three years later I was appointed Head of Department (Science) at Aspley High School in Brisbane. During this time I submitted a manuscript for a series of science activity books to Macmillan Education. A week later I was signed up and then started the serious work of perfecting the manuscripts.

I worked as a Head of Department in two other schools over the next eighteen years, as well as writing and, at the start of 1989, I finally hung up my teaching hat to became a full-time writer.

The inspiration for my writing came from my style of teaching. I always believed that students need to be totally and actively involved in any lesson. They need to discuss, ask questions, clarify any uncertainties and be active in the classroom. The manuscripts of my science books reflected that style.

Over 43 years Macmillan Australia published more than 60 titles written by my co-author, Ken Williamson, and me. Notable titles include Exploring Science, Science Now, Science Alive, many editions of ScienceWorld and Secondary Science. In 1998 Ken and I received an award from Macmillan for 1 million copies sold.

Firefly Publishing

In 1988 my partner Ann and I and teaching colleague Lesley Englert established Firefly Productions, where we self-published school musicals.

Soon after, I recognised an opportunity to publish educational resources. In 1992 Firefly Education (initially Firefly Press) was born with the publication of literacy companion workbooks written by Lesley for a number of my science series.

Using my experience in the classroom, I wanted to publish materials that were different from those on the market. My vision was to publish educational materials that encouraged students to make connections between what they learned in class and their everyday lives. At the same time the resources needed to support busy teachers and be easy to use in the classroom. By creating resources that combined these principles, I hoped to foster a love of learning in Australian classrooms.

In the following years, I worked with several authors (who were also practising teachers) to publish resources such as Letters and Sounds, Jigsaw Maths and the well-known Sound Waves and iMaths series. Each of these series focused on the principles and pedagogical approach which originated in my classroom teaching experience.

The Firefly Team

Firefly Education has gone from strength to strength, publishing award-winning books and innovative online resources including Sound Waves, iMaths, Writing Time, Think Mentals, and the digital programs Think Mentals Digital Classroom and English Stars. These products were developed totally in our Buderim offices. Our talented team of writers, editors, designers, programmers, animators and artists collaborate closely to produce world-class educational resources. Then the dedicated marketing team and sales consultants offer our products to Australia and the world.

Our world of publishing has changed over the nearly 30 years we have been in operation. In the early days we published student workbooks and teacher resources. Ten years later we established our online presence, and now we have our own bespoke digital products fully developed in-house.

I feel very privileged to work with such talented people at Firefly. When other people of my age pull the pin on their careers, I feel excited about going to work and sharing the team’s progress in the development of products.

Peter Stannard: Beyond educational publishing 

written by the Firefly team

Peter’s impressive teaching career and contribution to the educational publishing industry is just a small part of what makes him the man he is. Peter’s magnetic enthusiasm for learning is evident in many aspects of his personal life. Here’s just a few insights into what shapes Peter Stannard. 

 

 

Family man 

Peter’s enthusiasm for education comes from a simple joy in helping children reach their full potential. So, it may come as no surprise that Peter and Ann are proud foster-parents. Over a period of 21 years, they welcomed four underprivileged teenagers into their lives. Now, alongside their three biological children, these family ties are as strong as ever.

Business mentor 

In 2014, Peter and Ann travelled to Bali and went on a botany tour in Ubud run by a young local woman named Dewi. Peter quickly formed a connection with Dewi, sharing her passion for science and plants. Over the next few days this friendship flourished as Peter and Ann enjoyed hearing about the local land and customs, and Dewi and partner Dhika enjoyed receiving business advice. These conversations sparked an informal
business mentorship.

True to their nature, Peter and Ann didn’t take this mentorship lightly, enlisting the talent of Firefly Education employees to enhance Dewi’s business. It culminated in a company-wide business development trip to Bali where over 40 Firefly Education staff were able to exchange skills and expertise with Dewi and her team.

A generous leader 

Peter has cultivated a truly positive and enriching environment for staff at Firefly Education. When you visit the head office, it’s immediately apparent that it’s a family-owned business. In fact, it’s not unusual to see a grandchild pop in on the school holidays. Peter has gone above and beyond to create an inclusive and collaborative environment at Firefly. There are daily morning teas, family fun days, AGM team-building adventures and the staff were even invited to Peter’s surprise very big ‘0’ birthday party!

‘I’ve been fortunate enough to work at Firefly for seven years with Peter and Annie at the helm. Our company culture is absolutely led from the top. Peter’s teaching insight, capacity for new ideas and his generosity in mentoring has made, and continues to make, the culture at Firefly Education truly innovative, creative and fun.’ – Carlee Driscoll, General Manager, Firefly Education
‘Having known Peter and Ann for more years than I can remember, I was lucky to observe the early years of Peter’s enormous talent and enthusiasm for his teaching evolve into the publishing company that is the “Firefly family” today. His everyday actions continue as an example of leadership, generosity and compassion to family, friends and colleagues.’ – Lee Lemon, Business Development Officer, Firefly Education

A very deserving recipient for the inaugural Mike Horsley Award. Congratulations Peter! Thanks for all the work you have done on the Schools and Educational Publishing Committee of the Australian Publishers Association as well.

Agile and dynamic: independent educational publisher serving educators and students in new markets

Mizz De Zoysa-Lewis - MD Insight Publications

Mizz De Zoysa-Lewis is the Managing Director of Insight Publications – an independent educational publisher that specialises in resources for teaching English. Although traditionally focused on the Victorian market, the company recently launched its first dedicated resource for the Western Australian market. We spoke to De Zoysa-Lewis about the impetus for this interstate expansion and the values and goals that drive this small dynamic company.

“Insight Publications was founded by my mother-in-law and her partner many years ago. They were passionate about education and empowering young people across Australia and the globe. Initially a cottage industry operation, the business has grown significantly, especially over the last several years.”

De Zoysa-Lewis has been with Insight Publications for 16 years, having started working there when she was going through law school. “I loved what they did from the beginning. Seeing editors working on manuscripts and the marketing team reaching teachers in schools ignited a new passion for me.”

On completing her studies, De Zoysa-Lewis left Insight to work at a top-tier law firm for six months. But she found the experience unsatisfying: “My heart was back with Insight,” she says, and she soon returned to a full-time position with the company.

The change of career wasn’t without its challenges. “Even back then, publishing was not an easy industry to be in. It’s super competitive for Australian independent publishers and that hasn’t changed; however, I like that we all have a vision to empower educators.”

Relationship-building is a key aspect of the company’s day-to-day and one of the drivers behind its interstate expansion. “We have consolidated on so many years of experience. Our schools trust us to create the best possible English resources for their students. We have focused on building that trust in Victorian schools and recently we saw an opportunity to go across the Nullabor.”

The move was also inspired by the fact that De Zoysa-Lewis became aware of a spike in sales of Insight titles in WA. Although the books didn’t address all the curriculum requirements of WA English, it was clear that teachers found considerable value in them. “We saw there was a need for more tailored resources of this kind, so we wanted to act on that,” she says.

The team took time to thoroughly research and understand the WA curriculum. Year 12 English: Western Australia took two years to produce, from the initial idea to the release of the book. “We ran some focus groups and talked to educators as they’re the ones who stand in front of classrooms every day to teach the course,” says De Zoysa-Lewis. “Our titles are about serving the needs of students and educators and we wanted to tick the boxes for both of those audiences. That’s when things become highly accessible and engaging.”

The news that the company was creating a new, dedicated WA resource generated considerable excitement and anticipation among teachers. “They wanted us to get the book out as soon as possible! And that’s a nice kind of pressure to have.”

 

De Zoysa-Lewis says that the way in which the company created this resource demonstrates one of the best things about independent publishing in the educational space. “I say to my team that we are a bit like a speedboat. We can be really agile and change direction very quickly. So we were able to go ahead and develop this English title for the Year 12 Western Australian ATAR English course. We have now launched the book – we had a great launch event attended by many supportive WA teachers – and the reception has been overwhelming.”

 

Independent educational publishers in Australia are in a unique position, De Zoysa-Lewis says, because of the way in which their smaller size and greater flexibility allows them to service more schools, as well as provide resources to under resourced areas. “We’re a small team and yet our books are used in so many Victorian secondary schools. I’m proud to say we’re doing a great job. We’re successful enough to be able to grow and expand and that’s a great position to be in.”

Student-centered learning and empowering students to drive their own learning are concepts with popular currency. But De Zoysa-Lewis notes that the company has focused on such approaches from the time of its founding by her mother-in-law, and continues to do so. “I’m the daughter of a refugee, and when I came here at the age of seven, I had the privilege of knowing a lot of English. But so many students come to Australia and they’re struggling. Empowering students is something I think about all the time. Educational publishers share a role in helping students to develop those all-important language skills. Without that ability to communicate clearly, to write clearly and to express your thoughts, everything is so much harder.”

Over the years De Zoysa-Lewis has observed the increasing professionalisation of the educational publishing industry. She attributes this development in part to the pressure teachers are under to ensure their students are performing. “There’s improved transparency around what is taught and around student and school results, and that contributes to the pressure on teachers.”

One of the consequences of this is a growing emphasis on relationship-building between teachers and publishers. De Zoysa-Lewis says, “Obviously we can only help students by constantly engaging with the educators who are in front of students every day. It’s the only way we can know exactly what we can do to help teachers and students to achieve the best possible outcomes.”

Following their entry into the Western Australian market, Insight is excited about continuing to draw on its strengths as an independent Australian educational publisher to develop resources by cultivating meaningful relationships with educators and students across the country.

 

**Images courtesy of Insight Publications. Photos taken at the launch of Year 12 English: Western Australia.

1. Mizz De Zoysa-Lewis – Managing Director, Insight Publications. 

2. Adam Kealley, Trish Dowsett, Martin Guest and Maria White – Authors of Year 12 English: Western Australia text book.

3. Melanie Napthine and Robert Beardwood – Publishers at Insight Publications.

 

Most outstanding Australian classroom resources announced

Australian educators and publishers last night celebrated a year of making outstanding resources for student learning across the country at the Educational Publishing Awards Australia. Twenty vital learning tools produced by local publishers and used in primary, secondary and tertiary classrooms were awarded.

Two new awards were presented this year at The Arts Centre, Melbourne. The Scholarly Non-Fiction award for a work that serves the education market, had 34 nominations and five shortlisted, with Charles Massy’s agriculture-meets-ecology tome Call of the Reed Warbler (University of Queensland Press) taking out the inaugural prize. Using his personal experience from a chemical-using farmer to a radical ecologist the judges said, “Call of the Reed Warbler exemplifies the potential of research-based writing to speak beyond the academy, enriching public discussion and, without question, the lives of its readers.”

The second new award was made in honour of Professor Mike Horsley, who co-founded the EPAAs in 1994. The award is for dedication to the educational publishing sector and was awarded to Firefly Education’s Peter Stannard, who has been serving the sector for fifty years.

Firefly Education had a good night with three trophies, including one for most outstanding primary resource for Sound Waves Foundation. The judges said this resource was innovative in harnessing sound searches and bespoke images to help students use sound for literacy development.

Other outstanding winning resources were Poems to Share II produced by AATE and Red Room Poetry for secondary, and the Clinical Placement Manual for the Diploma of Nursing 1e by Catherine Joustra and Ali Moloney published by Cengage. The judges considered Poems to Share II a uniquely designed box set of cards and praised the use of creative writing works from students alongside teachers and established poets.

Judges commented that Clinical Placement Manual for the Diploma of Nursing 1e is well-designed for student self-assessment in that its Work Experience tool practically supports students’ work placements.

For the second year in a row Publisher of the Year was awarded to PLD Literacy (primary) and Oxford University Press (secondary).

Keynote speakers of the evening were Lian Davies – principal at Whittlesea Secondary College and previous Educator Rising Star recipient – plus the Copyright Agency’s Reading Australia Fellow for a Teacher of English and Literacy, Alex Wharton, who shared about his research into the textual representation of First Nation and non-First Nation colonial experience to will inform English teaching practice.

Other speakers on the night included Member for Higgins Dr Katie Allen MP, who has authored numerous scholarly texts in the area of pediatrics, and major sponsor of the event, the Copyright Agency’s Adam Suckling.

The event was coordinated by the Schools and Education Publishing Committee and supported by the Tertiary and Professional and Scholarly and Journal Publishing committees of the Australian Publishers Association.

Special thanks to our major sponsor: The Copyright Agency, and also to sponsors: OPUS Group, Newgen KnowledgeWorks, VitalSource, ReadCloud, IndigiPrint, CQUniversity, AAP Photos and Books + Publishing.

Read the full list of winners see this page on the website.

 

30 years in educational publishing – Heather Fawcett of Oxford University Press

Portrait of Heather Fawcett and Michael Gordon-Smith as Heather has been presented her George Robertson Award

Portrait of Heather Fawcett and Michael Gordon-Smith as Heather has been presented her George Robertson Award

Director of Higher Education at Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand, Heather Fawcett, was earlier this year awarded a prestigious George Robertson Award by the Australian Publishers Association. Heather tells us about her experiences, why she’s motivated to stay in the education publishing sector, and why she welcomes change.

I’m thrilled to be a recipient of a George Robertson Award, and very touched by the generous response of colleagues to this recognition.

I came to publishing after a short teaching career; my first publishing job was a Brisbane based primary sales role, the key product being large reading schemes that were typically a whole school purchase.

I moved into the tertiary sector in a Sydney sales based job and eventually found my way back to Melbourne where I was hired by OUP in 1993. The role, Academic Sales Manager, was my first management job, and I really loved the mix of my own territory and people management. Since then I have had at least a dozen different job titles at OUP across sales, marketing, publishing and management in Higher Ed, Academic, Trade, ELT, Dictionaries and Schools.

I’m somewhat reluctant to offer career advice, so please accept these thoughts in the spirit of reflection. In my experience, career advancement is supported by engagement with commercial imperatives and with the objectives of the organisation, a preparedness to take opportunities as they come along, and a genuine interest in customers. Opportunities abound when an organisation is in a growth phase, so by contributing to the growth of a business the chances of career growth are increased. If you happen to have young children while advancing a career, a supportive partner and awesome parents are a great asset; also know that if you do happen to work the odd long day, travel for work or miss the occasional event at their school, they will probably still turn out okay.

We hear much about the demands of managing and coping with change in the workplace and in our operating environments. Most changes at work are for the better; believe me – email and Yammer are a whole lot better than handwritten memos in triplicate and faxes, sending digital files to print is better than film, and it is good that we are not allowed to smoke at our desks! Anyway, there’s little point wishing that we could go back to the way things were when our customers have changed.

Throughout my career in education publishing I have been sustained and motivated by the knowledge that what we do is worthwhile work. It is a privilege to work with authors who are motivated by a genuine commitment to excellence in teaching and learning; they are experts in their field and could undoubtedly spend their time and effort on more financially lucrative pursuits however they chose to put their energy into developing resources to support teaching and learning at scale.

As publishers we play an important role in the delivery of good quality materials (print or digital); a great textbook is not simply about knowledge transfer, it is about developing proper understanding of a subject at the appropriate levels for all learners. The expertise that my colleagues hold, and continue to develop, in pedagogy, content delivery and design in response to the needs of educators and students makes coming to work meaningful

What else has kept me in educational publishing, and at OUP in particular, is the genuine commitment of colleagues to great outcomes for students of all ages. I can honestly say that I love coming to work because of the people I work with and the worthwhile work that we do.

I hope that many of you reading this find educational publishing such a satisfying career that you will eventually join me in addition to my colleagues, Florence Chin, Debra James, Richard Harms, Heather Robinson and others in the 30 year club.

 

Many thanks to Heather Fawcett from Oxford University Press for sharing her words. 

Science teacher on educational publishing with Tina Bean

Images of Cosmos Magazine covers

In this post, we interview secondary science teacher, Tina Bean, on the value of quality educational resources in the classroom. 

 

How long have you been a teacher and what inspired you to become one?

I have been a teacher for 10 years. I retrained to become a teacher because I wanted to give kids opportunities that I had never had. I enjoy working with teenagers in particular and I wanted those kids to be able to enjoy school and have a positive experience at school

What do you teaching and to what Grades?

I teach years 7-10 science and Senior Chemistry.

How often do you use published texts, learning resources and teacher guides for your classroom? Why do you choose to use them?

I use published resources frequently. I tend to use them to create my own resources in school that I adapt to my students. What I may use in one classroom I may not use in the other, even if I have two groups of students that in the same year. The resources that I use will depend upon what works best for the students, what I have the time to work through and work out how I will use them for my students and what level the resources are set at. Some resources are great for Gifted and Talented students but are not good for those who have learning difficulties or may be EAL/D students. I need to carefully go through each of my resources and figure out what will be best for which students.

I often choose resources that have different levels, simple over views and definition and then some work that I can give students that are working quickly through the resources and are enjoying science.

What features of an educational learning resource do you look out for? Why? 

I like my resources to have online support and little video’s included in the content that help to explain the resource. So I look for something where there may be a physical aspect for the content as well as an online platform that supports and expands on the content. I also like to be able to log in and see where my students are up to so that I can assess them and make sure that they are completing the content and understand the content. I want my educational resources to be colourful, high quality, durable and relevant to my students. I want my students to see themselves doing science not just an old fashioned notion of what a scientist is.

I work in science and it can be difficult to find experiments that will engage students. At the beginning of each year there will always be a group of students that ask if we can explode something. Obviously, that is not going to happen. However, I do want to have good quality practicals in my resources that I can work into my classes. Those practicals need to be clear, easy to implement, not require a lot of costly material and easy for students to understand. There also needs to be an understanding that neither the lab technician nor the teacher has a huge amount of time to set up really extensive practicals so any practicals need to be easy to manage and require small set up times.

What’s the most valuable thing about a high quality resource to you in your planning and classroom?

It engages the students and helps them to see science in a visual way and to want to learn more about science. A high quality resource will facilitate my teaching. I will be able to set work from the resource or work with the resource to spark whole class conversations and learning.

When I am planning I want to know that my resources are aligned to the syllabus and that I don’t have to flip back and forwards to another part of the resource, or to another resource to figure out how the resource is aligned to the syllabus. However, I don’t want to have to work through a text book from beginning to end either. I want to be able to flip to the sections that are relevant to me and to my class and ignore those that are not.

Is there a particular Australian resource that you really value? What is it and talk us through what aspects of it really work for you and your students.  

I really like the Cosmos magazines and their sister site Stileapp.com I like being able to customise the work. I love the fact that the units are updated regularly and that they are often based on new articles that are coming through all the time. I like the platform. The platform allows me to look at what my students are doing and how well they are performing. It allows me to see where a student is struggling and where we need to focus more as a class. At the same time I can always change things up if I want to and add in more content or less content.

How do students respond to high quality learning resources in your experience? To what extent can a good resource shift how engaged a student can be? Have you witnessed this happening with a particular student?

Quality resources can help to keep low ability students engaged while at the same time helping to facilitate higher level students explore on their own. I have one particular student, as soon as I gave them access to one particular resource they just powered ahead and explored everything they could. They were so interested. Others kept on working through the work that I requested them to work through, but this one particular student sat there and worked through everything, he wanted more. This is a great response from a student and I was so pleased to have access to a resource that I could use to expand his horizons and to facilitate his interest.​