Archive for August 2019

30 years in educational publishing – Heather Fawcett of Oxford University Press

Portrait of Heather Fawcett and Michael Gordon-Smith as Heather has been presented her George Robertson Award

Portrait of Heather Fawcett and Michael Gordon-Smith as Heather has been presented her George Robertson Award

Director of Higher Education at Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand, Heather Fawcett, was earlier this year awarded a prestigious George Robertson Award by the Australian Publishers Association. Heather tells us about her experiences, why she’s motivated to stay in the education publishing sector, and why she welcomes change.

I’m thrilled to be a recipient of a George Robertson Award, and very touched by the generous response of colleagues to this recognition.

I came to publishing after a short teaching career; my first publishing job was a Brisbane based primary sales role, the key product being large reading schemes that were typically a whole school purchase.

I moved into the tertiary sector in a Sydney sales based job and eventually found my way back to Melbourne where I was hired by OUP in 1993. The role, Academic Sales Manager, was my first management job, and I really loved the mix of my own territory and people management. Since then I have had at least a dozen different job titles at OUP across sales, marketing, publishing and management in Higher Ed, Academic, Trade, ELT, Dictionaries and Schools.

I’m somewhat reluctant to offer career advice, so please accept these thoughts in the spirit of reflection. In my experience, career advancement is supported by engagement with commercial imperatives and with the objectives of the organisation, a preparedness to take opportunities as they come along, and a genuine interest in customers. Opportunities abound when an organisation is in a growth phase, so by contributing to the growth of a business the chances of career growth are increased. If you happen to have young children while advancing a career, a supportive partner and awesome parents are a great asset; also know that if you do happen to work the odd long day, travel for work or miss the occasional event at their school, they will probably still turn out okay.

We hear much about the demands of managing and coping with change in the workplace and in our operating environments. Most changes at work are for the better; believe me – email and Yammer are a whole lot better than handwritten memos in triplicate and faxes, sending digital files to print is better than film, and it is good that we are not allowed to smoke at our desks! Anyway, there’s little point wishing that we could go back to the way things were when our customers have changed.

Throughout my career in education publishing I have been sustained and motivated by the knowledge that what we do is worthwhile work. It is a privilege to work with authors who are motivated by a genuine commitment to excellence in teaching and learning; they are experts in their field and could undoubtedly spend their time and effort on more financially lucrative pursuits however they chose to put their energy into developing resources to support teaching and learning at scale.

As publishers we play an important role in the delivery of good quality materials (print or digital); a great textbook is not simply about knowledge transfer, it is about developing proper understanding of a subject at the appropriate levels for all learners. The expertise that my colleagues hold, and continue to develop, in pedagogy, content delivery and design in response to the needs of educators and students makes coming to work meaningful

What else has kept me in educational publishing, and at OUP in particular, is the genuine commitment of colleagues to great outcomes for students of all ages. I can honestly say that I love coming to work because of the people I work with and the worthwhile work that we do.

I hope that many of you reading this find educational publishing such a satisfying career that you will eventually join me in addition to my colleagues, Florence Chin, Debra James, Richard Harms, Heather Robinson and others in the 30 year club.

 

Many thanks to Heather Fawcett from Oxford University Press for sharing her words. 

Science teacher on educational publishing with Tina Bean

Images of Cosmos Magazine covers

In this post, we interview secondary science teacher, Tina Bean, on the value of quality educational resources in the classroom. 

 

How long have you been a teacher and what inspired you to become one?

I have been a teacher for 10 years. I retrained to become a teacher because I wanted to give kids opportunities that I had never had. I enjoy working with teenagers in particular and I wanted those kids to be able to enjoy school and have a positive experience at school

What do you teaching and to what Grades?

I teach years 7-10 science and Senior Chemistry.

How often do you use published texts, learning resources and teacher guides for your classroom? Why do you choose to use them?

I use published resources frequently. I tend to use them to create my own resources in school that I adapt to my students. What I may use in one classroom I may not use in the other, even if I have two groups of students that in the same year. The resources that I use will depend upon what works best for the students, what I have the time to work through and work out how I will use them for my students and what level the resources are set at. Some resources are great for Gifted and Talented students but are not good for those who have learning difficulties or may be EAL/D students. I need to carefully go through each of my resources and figure out what will be best for which students.

I often choose resources that have different levels, simple over views and definition and then some work that I can give students that are working quickly through the resources and are enjoying science.

What features of an educational learning resource do you look out for? Why? 

I like my resources to have online support and little video’s included in the content that help to explain the resource. So I look for something where there may be a physical aspect for the content as well as an online platform that supports and expands on the content. I also like to be able to log in and see where my students are up to so that I can assess them and make sure that they are completing the content and understand the content. I want my educational resources to be colourful, high quality, durable and relevant to my students. I want my students to see themselves doing science not just an old fashioned notion of what a scientist is.

I work in science and it can be difficult to find experiments that will engage students. At the beginning of each year there will always be a group of students that ask if we can explode something. Obviously, that is not going to happen. However, I do want to have good quality practicals in my resources that I can work into my classes. Those practicals need to be clear, easy to implement, not require a lot of costly material and easy for students to understand. There also needs to be an understanding that neither the lab technician nor the teacher has a huge amount of time to set up really extensive practicals so any practicals need to be easy to manage and require small set up times.

What’s the most valuable thing about a high quality resource to you in your planning and classroom?

It engages the students and helps them to see science in a visual way and to want to learn more about science. A high quality resource will facilitate my teaching. I will be able to set work from the resource or work with the resource to spark whole class conversations and learning.

When I am planning I want to know that my resources are aligned to the syllabus and that I don’t have to flip back and forwards to another part of the resource, or to another resource to figure out how the resource is aligned to the syllabus. However, I don’t want to have to work through a text book from beginning to end either. I want to be able to flip to the sections that are relevant to me and to my class and ignore those that are not.

Is there a particular Australian resource that you really value? What is it and talk us through what aspects of it really work for you and your students.  

I really like the Cosmos magazines and their sister site Stileapp.com I like being able to customise the work. I love the fact that the units are updated regularly and that they are often based on new articles that are coming through all the time. I like the platform. The platform allows me to look at what my students are doing and how well they are performing. It allows me to see where a student is struggling and where we need to focus more as a class. At the same time I can always change things up if I want to and add in more content or less content.

How do students respond to high quality learning resources in your experience? To what extent can a good resource shift how engaged a student can be? Have you witnessed this happening with a particular student?

Quality resources can help to keep low ability students engaged while at the same time helping to facilitate higher level students explore on their own. I have one particular student, as soon as I gave them access to one particular resource they just powered ahead and explored everything they could. They were so interested. Others kept on working through the work that I requested them to work through, but this one particular student sat there and worked through everything, he wanted more. This is a great response from a student and I was so pleased to have access to a resource that I could use to expand his horizons and to facilitate his interest.​

Interview with Keynote Speaker, educator and Reading Australia fellow Alex Wharton

Alex Wharton is one of two keynote speakers at this year’s Educational Publishing Awards. He is Head of Middle School at Carinya Christian School, Gunnedah. Prior to this current role which still includes significant classroom teaching, he has served as an English Teacher and Head Teacher of English for a combined total of 10 years. Alex has written extensively with regards to teaching and learning resources for subject English, and presented at local, state and national conferences for English Teachers. Alex is the Copyright Agency’s first Reading Australia Fellow for Teacher of English and Literacy. Alex aims to use this opportunity to share this unique professional learning opportunity with colleagues, knowing full well this experience will further transform his own daily teaching and leadership practices within the English classroom.

 

 

What first inspired you to embark on a career in education?

I was significantly impacted by the teachers I had in my senior years of high school. They modelled to me life-long learning, a passion for your craft, and love of subject. Being in education is a wonderful way to make a tangible difference to the lives of others around you.

Is that what keeps you there now you’ve had experience in the field?

Yes! Education is about bettering others. Everyday, we are still able to develop and model to others the power of education to change the world.

You’ve just been awarded the Reading Australia Fellow for Teaching and Literacy. Can you tell us a little bit about the project you will be embarking on and what led you to want to work in this area?

I am so honoured to have received the inaugural Reading Australia Fellowship for Teachers of English and Literacy. My Fellowship is titled The Missing Peace and it is a literary analysis of the Australian representation surrounding the First Nation and non-First Nation colonial experience. A consideration of the textual representations relating to the colonial experience, this Project aims to bring together narratives from a variety of different writers to significantly inform English teaching practice.

The Copyright Agency’s CEO Mr Adam Suckling has said, “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures is a cross curriculum priority (also known as the CCP) in Australian schools, but teachers are often scrambling to find great resources to bring these perspectives to life.” 

So over the next twelve months, I am using the $15,000 funding to research the representation of the colonial experience in every state and territory in Australia. This involves conferences, museums, libraries, interviews, school visits, academic presentations, and in depth research into literature.

What do you anticipate might be an outcome of your research that may impact or be meaningful to the Australian educational publishing community? 

The notion of something being missing is a key motif which drives much of our greatest Australian literature. Yet, one can only be aware of something being missing, when the knowledge of what should be there, arises. The Missing Peace is a research based, Australian literary analysis project, which seeks to address the missing pieces (oh yes, word play!) in the professional knowledge of English teachers regarding Indigenous and non-Indigenous representations pertaining to the colonial experience.

Is there a gap in what educational publishers are producing to help with Indigenous literacy? Or are there publications that are hitting the spot in your observations? 

Author Ellen van Neerven has written some fantastic content on how teaching books by Indigenous authors has a huge impact on both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. Magabala Books – Australia’s oldest independent Indigenous publishing house – is doing some exceptional and exciting work in this space, and I am looking forward to meeting with them in coming months as part of my Reading Australia Fellowship.

To change tact now, when it comes to choosing educational resources for your school, what features do you look out for? Why?

I look for curriculum mapping and alignment, that the resource is both relevant and engaging to our student learning experience. I interrogate a text for its adaptability, for its usefulness and consider ways that it can bring about transformative learning experiences for the students in our care. 

What’s the most valuable thing about a high quality resource to you for planning and in the classroom?

It is the trust and confidence that comes with using a high quality resource in my classroom. It enables me to use the resource as a vehicle to shape understanding, to build a positive learning experience, and to challenge thinking in ways which classrooms were designed for.

Is there a particular Australian resource that you really value? What is it and talk us through what aspects of it really work for you and your students.

The Copyright Agency’s Reading Australia resource suite is by far the most valuable to my work as an English Teacher. Reading Australia provides teaching resources for Australia’s greatest literature and it’s all mapped to the Australian Curriculum. It’s a resource made freely available to teachers, and written by teachers for their use in the classroom. I love that it offers quality Australian literature suggestions, accompanied by the most incredible collection of resources ranging from academic essays, to author podcasts, to units of work that I know I will love teaching and my students will love learning from. 

I think the world of the Australian education publishing sector makes an incredibly valuable contribution to our society. We are fortunate to have a sector who is committed to advancing the cause of education for the ultimate benefit of others – our students. 

 

The Educational Publishing Awards will be held 4 September 2019. Get your tickets here.